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Ginger’s Friday Roundup: Favorite Personal Finance Posts of the Week


Creative Commons License photo credit: Dawn Endico

Spring time is upon us and that meant really great weather here in DC this week. Sadly, for me this meant being shackled down in the library and the home office trying to meet several deadlines for my classes. Never fear though, my personal finance blogger counterparts were hard at work. I really liked all of these posts and even printed out most of them because they were just that good! I know that I’ve been quite concerned about the recession lately so seeing all the posts related to that is a welcomed relief.

Check them out and let me know what you think. I think the posts on the recession and the career woman series by Single were especially thorough and informative.

The Professional Woman by Single Ma @ Fabulous Financials

Part I: The Professional Woman

Part II: The Myth of Having it All and Being Assertive

Part III: Leadership Styles (participative vs. command & control)

Part IV: Developing Relationships (networking and mentoring)

Part V: Summary and Recommended Reading

100 Ways to Cope With Inflation by the Honest Dollar

# Don’t buy premium if you don’t need to. Most cars are designed to run on regular, unleaded gas. Buying premium gas does not improve performance and can cost you $200 or more per year. In fact, even if your manual calls for premium, you may be able to use regular under certain conditions.

# Fill it all the way up. If you consistently leave the tank a quarter or a third empty, you’ll ultimately make more trips to the gas station – a waste of time, energy, and fuel. Make sure you have enough money on hand to pay for a full tank.

# Don’t top off. Topping off doesn’t add any gas to your tank; the tank’s full, and you’re paying for gas you’ll never use. Instead, the extra gas evaporates in your car, which can damage your vehicle’s vapor collection system. Avoid the urge to go for that extra drop.

15 Ways to Earn a Reputation as an Expert in Your Field by Nancy J

1. First and foremost, do great work for your clients so they are happy to go to the mountaintops with their bugles to sing your praises. If you are truly doing a great job for your clients, you have earned the right to ask for testimonials and use them to celebrate your expertise.

2. Be clear about your commitment to serve others first so your own success can grow. When you share general tips and information that ease aches and pains others are experiencing in their businesses, you will invite others to engage you for a fee for the specifics to solve those problems.

3. Craft a fabulous bio that proves and declares your expertise in a winning, memorable way. Leave the blah, blah, blah boring bio behind and lead with a story that is memorable, likable, and worthy of respect. You and your expertise will be well served.

When Times are Tight: 168 Frugal Tips to Make Your Dollar Stretch by Lynnae at BeingFrugal.net

  • If you live in an apartment, see if you can split the cost of a wireless connection with your neighbors. But make sure it’s legal first.
  • Turn off the PC if you won’t be using it for an hour or more.
  • Use nightlights in the bathroom, so if you have to use the bathroom at night, you don’t have to turn on the light.
  • Keep the freezer full. If you have to, put milk jugs filled with water in the freezer. It’s less expensive to keep a full freezer cold than an empty one.

Enjoy your weekend!

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  • Marcia Brixey

    Hi Ginger!

    I’m Marcia Brixey, author of The Money Therapist: A Woman’s Guide to Creating a Healthy Financial Life (Seal Press) published this month. I’m also the Founder and President of Money Wise Women Educational Services, a non-profit organization dedicated to educating and empowering women to achieve financial fitness. Our organization hosts Money Wi$e Women Conferences in the Western U.S.

    You’ve got lots of greaet information on your blog. I have a couple of suggestions for women to get in touch with their spending.

    Begin by tracking your spending for at least two weeks. Write down everything you buy, whether you use cash, check, debit card or credit card. Use a blank checkbook register or small notebook. At the end of the time review your expenditures to see where your money’s been going. My prediction is you’ll discover dollar dribbling—things you’re spending more on than you thought. Simply writing it down will probably prompt you to spend 10% to 20% less.

    Before you make a purchase use the Checkout Checklist and ask yourself these questions:
    Do I really want this?
    Do I need this?
    Will I use this?
    Am I buying this just because it’s on sale?
    How many hours do I have to work to pay for this?
    Do I really love this?

    Warmly,
    Marcia Brixey
    http://www.moneywisewomen.net
    http://www.themoneytherapist.net
    http://www.marciabrixey.com

  • http://www.mainstreetmediasavvy.com Nancy Juetten

    Hi Ginger,

    Thanks much for sharing my tips for building a reputation as an expert with your readers. I love the mission of your blog, and I welcome the opportunity to earn new readers for mine.

    Speaking of which, I know a couple of fabulous women — Mikelann Valterra and Marcia Brixey — both of whom wrote great books about women and making the most of their earning power and their money. I’d love to introduce you to them. Visit http://www.womenearning.com and http://www.moneywisewomen.net to learn more.

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