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Woman Negotiating

Equifax Gets OWNED: Woman Wins $18M Lawsuit Because of Credit Errors

If you’ve ever disputed an incorrect item on your credit report only to be pulled into a fight with the credit bureau – read on.  You’ll love this.  Dispute and we’ll investigate Equifax said…

If you believe that any item of information contained in your Equifax credit file is incomplete or inaccurate, simply notify us directly and we will promptly investigate the matter with the source that provided the information.Equifax

Equifax is learning an expensive lesson in telling the truth this week.  That lesson cost them about $18 million to be exact!

Julie Miller of Marion County was awarded $18.4 million in punitive damages and $180,000 in compensatory damages, though Friday’s award against one of the nation’s major credit bureaus….

The jury was told she contacted Equifax eight times between 2009 and 2011 in an effort to correct inaccuracies, including erroneous accounts and collection attempts, as well as a wrong Social Security number and birthday. Her lawsuit alleged the Atlanta-based company failed to correct the mistakes.

“There was damage to her reputation, a breach of her privacy and the lost opportunity to seek credit,” said Justin Baxter, a Portland attorney who worked on the case with his father and law partner, Michael Baxter. “She has a brother who is disabled and who can’t get credit on his own, and she wasn’t able to help him.”

I feel so sorry for this poor woman!  She contacted Equifax a total of 8 times over 2 years pleading with them to correct the inaccuracies such as an incorrect social security number, birthday and collection accounts.  As you can imagine they failed to follow through which cost her lost opportunities to get credit in her name.

This is huge for consumers because I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been caught up in pretty much pleading with credit bureaus to change incorrect information on a credit report.  Then being forced to wait for the information to “fall off” based on SOLs because they refused to do their job.  It will be interesting to see how seriously they take these matters moving forward.

Will they investigate and actually do their due diligence on a dispute request or will it get tossed to the side?  What do you think?

 

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